Tobacco

Tobacco use continues to be the leading cause of preventable death across NC and the US. Unfortunately, NC continues to have higher smoking rates compared to the US as a whole.


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Nutrition


The percentage of adult North Carolinians who eat at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily is just 12.3%, less than half of the 2020 goal of 29.3%.


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Physical Activity

Less than half of adult North Carolinians get the recommended minimum of 150 minutes/week of physical activity at a moderate level.


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Obesity

NC ranks 25th highest in the nation for the number of adult residents who are obese. Two out of every three NC adults and more than a quarter of NC high school students are overweight or obese.

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NC Health
At A Glance

Unhealthy behaviors (namely smoking, poor diet, and lack of physical activity) combine with challenging economic factors (poverty, lack of insurance, and unemployment) to put North Carolina behind the national curve on life expectancy and chronic disease.


Shorter lives, more risk factors

The average resident of North Carolina has a life expectancy

than the average US resident, according to this 2011 data


Leading Causes of Death for NC (Rates)


Cause



Comparatively
All Deaths 838.8 807.3 Worse
Cancer (All Sites) 188.8 185.1 Worse
Heart Disease 177.3 191.5 Better
Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease 49.6 45.9 Worse
Cerebrovascular Disease 44.9 41.4 Worse
Alzheimer's Disease 29.2 27.3 Worse
Diabetes 24.6 23.7 Worse
Nephritis, Nephrotic Syndrome & Nephrosis 16.9 14.6 Worse
Pneumonia & Influenza 19.5 17.3 Worse
Motor Vehicle Injuries 13.6 11.3 Worse
All Unintentional Injuries 30.1 40.6 Better






Life Expectancy, by Race (years)


White


African American


Latino


Asian American


Native American


Risk Factors and Chronic Disease Rates for NC


Cardiovascular Risk

Asthma

Overweight & Obese


Tobacco

Tobacco use continues to be the number one leading cause of preventable death across NC and the US.

Unfortunately, NC continues to have higher smoking rates (20.2%) compared to the US as a whole (19%). But more North Carolinians are trying to quit –

as compared to 55.7% across the US. Right now, North Carolina invests $1.14 per smoker in the QuitlineNC – less than 11% of the CDC’s recommended investment of $10.53 per smoker.




WORKSITES THAT OFFER CESSATION SUPPORT

Among NC worksites using WorkHealthy America, % that refer
tobacco users (who are ready to quit) to multiple resources
including cessation medications and in-depth counseling/coaching

All Sectors (N = 147) 78%
Business (N = 48) 69%
Hospitals (N = 51) 96%
Government Agencies (N = 48) 67%

State-Wide Tobacco Policies

Is there a statewide policy, voluntary policy,
or law requiring tobacco-free...?

YES

NO




Are local officials prohibited from passing
stronger tobacco prevention laws for…?











What Makes Up Our Tobacco Grade?


Behavior, Environment or Policy

Current Status

2020 Goal

2015 Grade
Current Adult Smokers 20.2% 12% F
Current Adult Smokeless Tobacco Users 2.1% 0.3% F
High School Students Using Tobacco 29.7% 15% D
Middle School Students Using Tobacco 11% 5.7% F
Pregnant Women Who Smoke 10.3% 6.8% C
Pregnant Women Who Quit Smoking 55.4% 30% A
Adults Making a Serious Attempt to Quit 60% 80% D
High School Students Making a Serious Attempt to Quit 52.4% 64% F
Smoke Free Homes 79.4% 87% F
Smokers Counseled by Provider within Past Year to Stop Smoking 58.3% 24.9% A
Per-pack Cigarette Tax vs. $1.54 National Average $0.45 $1.95 F
Youth Exposed to Tobacco Marketing at Points of Purchase 84.6% 77.1% F






Current Smokers by Age Group

Seniors (ages 65+)
9.7%
Adults (ages 55-64)
17.3%
Adults (ages 45-54)
27.2%
Adults (ages 35-44)
20.7%
Adults (ages 25-34)
24.6%
College-aged (ages 18-24)
23.5%
Youth (grades 6-12)
15%









How did we get our Tobacco Grade?

Click here to further explore the data that makes up
our Tobacco Grade in this Report Card


Nutrition




The percentage of adult North Carolinians who eat at least



is just 12.3%, less than half of
the 2020 goal of 29.3%.

















What Makes Up Our Nutrition Grade?


Grade: F


Adults who eat at least 5 servings of fruits & vegetables daily (%)

Grade: D


Infants who are breastfed at 6 months of age (%)

Grade: F


Households that experience food insecurity (%)

How did we get our Nutrition Grade?

Click here to further explore the data that makes up
our Nutrition Grade in this Report Card


Physical Activity




Less than half of adult North Carolinians get the recommended minimum of



of physical activity at a moderate level.

In general, residents of all ages need more time being physically active and less time sitting in front of screens – televisions, computers, etc.


What Makes Up Our Physical Activity Grade?


Adults getting recommended amount of physical activity (%)


Adults- Physical Activity


High school students watching TV/video or playing video games for no more than 2 hours a day (%)

High School Students - Screen Time


High school students getting recommended amount of physical activity (%)

High School - Physical Activity


Middle school students watching TV/video or playing video games for no more than 2 hours a day (%)

Middle School Students - Screen Time


How did we get our Physical Activity Grade?

Click here to further explore the data that makes up
our Physical Activity Grade in this Report Card




Obesity



Two out of every three NC adults (66%) and over a quarter (almost 28%) of NC high school students are overweight or obese. Obesity is a leading risk factor for other chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and stroke as well as some cancers.

Adult Overweight & Obesity

66.1%
64.8%

Healthy North Carolinians 2020 Goal – 61.9%



Obesity Rates by Education Level (%)

College graduates are less likely to be obese
than individuals with fewer years of education





What makes up our Obesity Grade?

Grade: F


Adults Who are at a Healthy Weight (%)

Grade: F


HS Students who are at a
healthy weight (%)

Grade: D


Middle school students who believe
they are at a healthy weight (%)

How did we get our Obesity Grade?

Click here to further explore the data that makes up
our Obesity Grade in this Report Card



What Success Looks Like


Sector: Nonprofit childcare; 45 employees
Excellence Recognition winner, WorkHealthy America

Committing to healthier employee policies has created a multiplier effect at Partners in Learning, a nonprofit childcare center on the campus of Catawba College in Salisbury. As employees have improved their food choices and increased their exercise, they are sharing their enthusiasm for healthy changes with the center’s children and families. Wellness committee members have integrated many of the center’s healthy staff policies and initiatives into its curriculum. Children enjoy more physical activity opportunities and games in the classroom; staff members are offered gym membership reimbursements and paid breaks for exercise. Healthy meals featuring seasonal produce are served family-style with staff and children dining together. Among the 45 employees, the results include drops in blood pressure, blood sugar, smoking, and weight. Employees recently lost a total of 109 pounds, for example, through team competitions, running groups, and other supports. “I am proud that our center has a wellness director and committee that work hard to help make positive changes which took place in a short amount of time,” says Executive Director Norma Honeycutt.

"Ultimately, we’re teaching the children and setting good examples for them at an early age.”

– Deborah Howell, Assistant Director








Sector: professional services; 46 employees

Excellence Recognition winner, WorkHealthy America

The 46-employee accounting firm Johnson Price Sprinkle has undergone a transformation that includes encouraging work/life balance, healthy behaviors, and group activities. “It’s created a culture shift for us. CPA firms aren’t usually thought of as ‘fun’ places, but we’ve introduced some things that end up being a little more lighthearted,” says CEO Ben Hamrick. Participating in WorkHealthy America helped JPS to reduce tobacco use while encouraging more physical activity and healthy food choices during the work day. The company earned BusinessNC magazine’s third-place ranking among small- to medium-sized businesses for “2014 Best Employers in North Carolina.” Employees surveyed as part of that ranking cited reimbursements for gym or YMCA memberships as a favorite perk. Other changes that earn a thumbs-up from JPS employees: working with local caterers to make healthy, labeled options available at all catered meetings and events; choosing tobacco-free venues for off-site events; and paid breaks for physical activity during work hours.

"The sense of ‘team’ we create through our outings and physical activities like 5K runs and wallyball matches translates to the workplace and only strengthens the cohesive group.”

– Ben Hamrick, CEO & President




Sector: manufacturing; 1,500 employees

Excellence Recognition winner, WorkHealthy America

The wellness team at this three-shift manufacturing plant, DSM-Dyneema, made it a priority that all health and wellness efforts would reach everyone, from shift workers with fixed schedules to executive staff. Among their successes: giving all employees access to an onsite gym at no cost, lengthening shift workers’ lunches to allow them time to work out, giving healthy foods in the cafeteria and vending machines a lower price, and offering discounts on health insurance premiums for smokers who participate in tobacco cessation classes. The wellness team has also drawn on the expertise of neighboring East Carolina University, hiring exercise physiology interns to design stretching and exercise routines.

"Providing wellness avenues for our employees helps them manage the stress that we all see in everyday life.”

– Randy McGowan, former Vice President for Manufacturing

DSM-Dyneema

Greenville, NC









Building a Culture of Wellness



What is a Culture of Wellness?


Because we spend most of our waking hours at work, every workplace can play an important role in supporting employees’ health. Creating a strong culture of wellness means more than holding an occasional wellness challenge—it means implementing lasting policies, incorporating healthy practices into your core values, and engaging the support of senior leadership.





How to get started

Sectors
Include employee wellness as a part of the organization’s strategic plan

Have CEO or Senior Leadership participation in wellness activities

Have a wellness committee that meets on a regular basis

Conduct a health risk assessment (HRA) at least annually
All Sectors 61% 84% 72% 61%
Businesses 60% 88% 58% 63%
Hospitals 76% 95% 79% 93%
Government Agencies 48% 70% 80% 34%
*The data above comes from all worksites using WorkHealthy America in NC.

Culture of Wellness




Click here to further explore the data that can
help establish a culture of wellness

How To Improve Our Grades


Individuals

Target about 30 minutes a day for physical activity.
Make it a regular part of your day or week.

Parents

Feed your family more nutritious foods
and reap the benefit of healthier kids.

Schools

Offer more nutritious foods in cafeterias at lower cost
and remove unhealthy items from vending machines.





Employers

Create a tobacco-free workplace policy.
Start a fruit bowl in the break room.

Healthcare Providers

Ask your patients if they use tobacco and,
if they do, help them quit.

Policy Makers

Support legislation that creates communities supportive of physical, healthy lifestyles and personal well-being.

Thank You to Our Lead Partners